In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

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Alice Through the Looking Glass

There is no magic, no wonder, just junk rehashed from a movie that was itself a rehash of Lewis Carroll, tricked out with physically unpersuasive…

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Holy Hell

The story of a cult as told by a filmmaker assigned to glorify it; intriguing but superficial.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Roger Ebert is My Superhero

San Diego Comic-Con is under way, and it inspired me to go back and read some of Roger’s reviews of superhero movies (ten of which are linked below). Roger confessed to having a particular fondness for the superhero comic book (graphic novel) movie genre. As I read some of the reviews, I realized that to me Roger was my Superhero, the bespectacled, mild-mannered film critic who becomes Super Roger when yielding his Golden Thumb in favor of quality or fun films, whether indies or blockbusters, or when advocating for the rights of those without power. The ordinary man who becomes extraordinary when he unleashes his ability to empathize with others, racing to the defense of people of another race or age or ability or economic status. The hero who can rouse the consciousness of others to come together around issues of social justice and fair play. And the man who had an inner core of steel, and a physical constitution so strong he eluded Death until he was ready to submit on his own terms.

What I love about Steve James’ documentary "Life Itself" is that you see all of the various incarnations of Roger as he goes from ordinary human to superhero: his boyhood; his passion for journalism; his sense of fair play; his carousing and falling to his kryptonite, alcohol, and how he ultimately defeated it; his relationship with his frenemy Gene Siskel as they changed the landscape of film criticism and how the public viewed films. And most important for me, Roger’s embrace of the unconditional love we had for each other. How that and our family life he so cherished strengthened his superpowers. How at the end of his life he morphed into this transcendent other, inspiring us to live better lives, hold our loved ones even closer, and strive to make this world a better place. What a Superhero!

I called upon our Far-Flung Correspondent Krishna Shenoi to create a visual representation of these words I wrote about Roger, and he did not disappoint. All of the Super Roger illustrations are by Krishna.

Ten of Roger’s reviews below offer a sampling of his fondness for this genre. But there are many other reviews we could have chosen that you will find at RogerEbert.com.

To see "Life Itself" in theaters or on video on demand or iTunes, see: magpictures.com/LifeItself

"Superman" (Great Movie essay)

"Superman" (original review)

"Superman II"

"The Crow"

"X2: X-Men United"

"Spider-man 2"

"Batman Begins"

"Iron Man"

"The Dark Knight"

"Marvel's The Avengers"

TO SEE “LIFE ITSELF” in Theaters, On Demand or iTunes: go to: MagPictures.com/LifeItself


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