In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb nnkxdfey7yagnicxkvwuxy7gvat

Stronger

Some of it is too broad, and I wish it dug a little deeper at times, but this is one of those rare inspirational films…

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Far Flunger Archives
Other Articles
Channel Archives

Blogs

Readers Debate: 'Robots'

Primary eb20050311commentary50316001ar

I went to see the "Robots" film with my wife and, although the film is stunning visually and in conception, we both felt uncomfortable while watching. We ended up leaving after 30 minutes. Here were the problems we had with this movie:

Continue reading →

Lucas demonstrates potential of digital video with 'Attack of the Clones'

After seeing the new "Star Wars" movie projected on film, I wrote that the images had "a certain fuzziness, an indistinctness that seemed to undermine their potential power." But I knew the film had been shot on digital video, and that George Lucas believed that it should preferably be seen, not on film, but projected digitally. Sunday I was able to see the digital version, and Lucas is right: "Star Wars: Episode II--Attack of the Clones" is sharper, crisper, brighter and punchier on digital than on film.

Continue reading →

Studio slaughtered 'Babe 2'

The most enchanting film of the year is going down in flames. "Babe: Pig in the City," which will make a surprising number of critics' "10 best" lists, has been crushed by "A Bug's Life" and by wrongheaded publicity. It's outta here.

Continue reading →

Mini festival of Cassavetes films explores emotional core of works

The films of John Cassavetes come in a deluge of words and emotions, of grand and sad gestures, of characters who want to love and don't know how. His people are often balanced between the terror and exhilaration of manic-depression. Since he uses the same friends and family members again and again, since he sometimes uses his homes as locations, there is a feeling sometimes that he's cutting close to the bone: His movies are the autobiography of his emotions.

Continue reading →

Ebert Gets to the Crust of the Matter

I've been watching those new Pizza Hut commercials with a mounting sense of unease. The ones where Donald and Ivana Trump discuss the new "stuffed crust pizza" design. Intended for those who like pizza but don't like the crust, this overhauled design wraps the crust around a string of mozzarella cheese.

Continue reading →

The Mystery of the 'Spontaneous Exchange'

It is an open secret that the "spontaneous exchanges" on talk shows are somewhat planned in advance. What has surprised me is how often the hosts depart entirely from the script. In many appearances on the Leno, Carson and Letterman programs, I would estimate that less than half of what happened was foreseen, and in some cases entire appearances were ad-libbed. The "pre-interview" is more like a safety net.

Continue reading →

Hope Springs From 'Sirens'

Filmgoers should be cheered by the news that an Australian film named "Sirens" is doing strong business at the nation's box offices. It is loosely inspired by the life and times of a colorful painter named Norman Lindsay, who shocked his country in the 1930s with an unconventional lifestyle that included large numbers of beautiful women who were his models, muses and, occasionally, lovers.

Continue reading →