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Jimi: All Is by My Side

What’s fascinating about “Jimi: All Is By My Side” is not only its decision to show us this particular chapter in Hendrix’s life, but also…

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The Boxtrolls

"The Boxtrolls" is a beautiful example of the potential in LAIKA's stop-motion approach, and the images onscreen are tactile and layered. But, as always, it's…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Siskel & Ebert review B-Rated movies. And C. And D...

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Marie writes: It's no secret how we feel about B-rated movie trailers inside the Ebert Club; there's nothing like a steaming pile of crap to inspire a good laugh. And it seems we're not alone. For behold: Siskel & Ebert and "The Stinkers of 1983". To enjoy even more amusing discoveries join the Club and explore a truly eclectic assortment of finds. Your subscription helps support the Newsletter, the Far-Flung Correspondents and the On-Demanders.

Go here to join the Ebert Club. Your subscription helps support the Ebert Club Newsletter, the Far-Flung Correspondents and The Demanders.

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I unwisely asked Marie Haws why it took so long for Snail Mail to reach her

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Marie is the Hon. Sec'y of The Ebert Club, and editor of our newsletter. As you can see, she communicates well in images.

Here is a free sample of The Ebert Club Newsletter. So hop on board, already.

Whenever you send me stuff in the mail, you always wonder why it takes so long. I live in a foreign country. :-) Otherwise, behold my physical mail box. Size of a shoe box, it can hold letters, flyers, DVD's, bubble envelopes, etc. Anything bigger than that, and you'll get a note from Canada Post to pick it up at the Mall, etc. When it's UPS or FEDX, they paste a sticker notice thing near your box so you'll see it. The building I live in was built circa 1973 and the style resembles Canadian architect Arthur Erickson, channeling Frank Lloyd Wright on Crack. LOL Wait till you see the "Mall".... it's a 19th century diorama. :-)

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We are so very, very, very small

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The graphic was created by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to represent 1,235 planets we know to exist, and the suns they orbit. Each planet is a black dot. Our sun is below the top row at the right. It's estimated that millions of such planets exist in our galaxy alone.

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Finding the mysterious Vivian Maier

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I have the book. This great photographer died unknown, having made an invaluable photographic record of the Chicago of her time. The rediscovery of her work was a great event in the history of photography. The director of this film is Charlie Siskel, Gene's nephew.

Here is a story in Variety.

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Second-guessing my Oscar guesses

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In announcing my annual Outguess Ebert contest, I used a cocky headline: Outguess Ebert? I may have them all right, I followed by writing: "This year's Outguess Ebert contest seems a little like shooting fish in a barrel. For the first time in many a year, maybe ever, I think I've guessed every one correctly."

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Does anybody here know what time it is?

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By Roger Ebert

Note in particular what I am doing with my hands. Then see the happiness on our faces. This photo was taken when a plaque was placed on the sidewalk during Ebertfest 2010, marking my birthplace at 410 E. Washington Street in Urbana. The woman is Sally Omiston. The Ormiston family (her husband "Ormy" and their two boys Fred and Georg) lived directly across the street.

Sally celebrated her 100th birthday on Feb. 9. I received a mistaken message from Urbana (no doubt from someone who saw "100" under her photo in The News-Gazette and drew a hasty conclusion. I have never been happier to correct a mistaken tweet.

Sally taught me to tell time. Unable to speak, I'm pointing to where a wristwatch goes.

Sally's intervention in my life may have come in the nick of time. I had my appendix removed, and when I returned to St. Mary's Grade School, Sister Nathan did an evaluation to determine if I had lost any speed. She sent a note to my parents: "Roger doesn't know his multiplication tables or how to read the clock."

What grade was I in? Certainly a grade where this raised a red flag. My parents took direct action. On a cardboard that came with a shirt from the laundry, my father wrote out the tables in his sure, strong hand, using the fountain pen filled with green ink that my mother used as a bookkeeper at the Allied Finance.

I was to spend half an hour after dinner every day memorizing the tables while sitting on the living room sofa, while my parents had their coffee and read the Gazette and Courier while firing up their Luckies. The silence was punctuated from time to time by mom or dad, saying: "I see in the paper..." and by my stifled sobs. What other kid ever had such cruel parents?"

It was easier to learn about the clock. Sally had been an elementary school teacher before got married. She brought home a big wooden Playskool clock she placed on her kitchen table between us. Its hands and numbers were removable and could be replaced by the wooden slices of a Pie of Time so that any fool could see that a quarter hour or a half hour had been consumed.

On summer evenings my dad and Ormy would stand on the lawn and talk things over. This was an occasion for Ormy to smoke his pipe.

"The Ormiston Boys are allergic to tobacco smoke," my father told me. "He's given up on smoking his pipe indoors. A pipe smoker loves his pipe. Think how much he loves those boys!"

The Ormiston Boys, George and Fred, were enough younger than me that we existed on different planes of reality. For books of Green Stamps I got two flimsy aluminum bookcases, and stacked one on top of the other inside my bedroom door, so that when it was opened all you could see was a wall of books.

The Ormistons came over to visit one day, and when the boys started horsing around, they knocked into my cases and all my books came tumbling down. Oh, how I hated those boys.

Sally Ormiston and Pastor J. Michael Smith, Grace United Methodist Church, at her 100th birthday party:

The News-Gazette reported:

Sylvia "Sally" Ormiston of Savoy is celebrating her 100th birthday with an open house from 1 to 5 p.m. Feb. 9 at Parkview, 100 Parkview Lane, Savoy. She was born on Feb. 8, 1913, in Witt, Ill., a daughter of George and Rose Sellett Rushford.

She married Professor E.E. Ormiston on Dec. 21, 1940. He died on March 16, 1996.

They have two sons, George Ormiston of Georgia and Fred Ormiston of Texas; six grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren.

She graduated from LaSalle High School and LaSalle-Peru Junior College. She retired from a career as a teacher in Grand Ridge, Ill., when she was married in 1940.

She is a member of Grace United Methodist Church, the Carle Foundation Hospital Auxiliary and the Champaign County Nursing Home Auxiliary.

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